Delight your family with a homemade version of this beloved regional treat

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There are many different names for fried bread throughout the western United States. Depending on where you are and who you talk to, you’ll hear it called Indian fry bread, Navajo fry bread, and even scones. It’s popular in various Native American cultures. You’ll find it served plain or dusted with powdered sugar and drizzled with honey, or, in place of tortillas, “Indian tacos,” filled with the usual taco fillings.
Not only are there different names for the crispy fried dough, but there are also different styles. Some are made from a yeast dough or include cornmeal. Others include lard or egg in the dough. This version is a simple flour-and-milk dough with baking powder for leavening. The result is a donut-like fried treat that’s crispy on the outside, and tender and light on the inside.
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Cooktop Cove
Homemade Fry Bread
4
10 minutes
5 minutes
15 minutes
Vegetable oil for frying
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup milk
Fill a deep saucepan with about 1 inch of vegetable oil, and heat it to 350 F.
While the oil is heating, in a mixing bowl stir together the flour, baking powder and salt. Add the milk, and stir until the mixture comes together. Turn the dough out onto a floured board and knead several times.
Divide the dough into 4 equal pieces, and roll the pieces into balls. Use a rolling pin to roll each dough ball out into a circle about ½ inch thick.
Fry one or two at a time for 1-2 minutes per side, until golden brown all over. Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate to drain.
Serve warm.
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This is a delicious treat I enjoyed growing up, and this is one of the ultimate recipes.
October 24   ·  
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